Embroidered Lifeline for Palestinian Women Refugees in Jordan

Empowering Embroidery

Discovered thanks to the Guardian another amazing initiative using crafts, embroidery in this case, to support women refugees social inclusion. SEP JORDAN, is a social entrepreneurship initiative founded by Roberta Ventura, an Italian born woman based in Geneva.

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Credits: The Guardian. Asma Aradeh, employed by social enterprise SEP Jordan inspects embroidery work together with two colleagues. Photograph: Faras Oran

SEP Jordan describes themselves as ethical fashion start-up distinguished by their intricate embroidery and geometric patterns, and storytelling. For them “Every Stitch Tells a Story: each piece is embroidered by a single talented artist” based in  Jerash Camp in Jordan.

Ensuring that the marvelous cross-stitch technique is being passed down from generation to generation, SEP Jordan works to empower “less fortunate artists with professional, personal and economic stability”.

CNN visit their atelier and interviewed Palestinian artists on the impact of this beautiful work.

Discover their amazing work here and follow the on facebook.

 

 

Anni Albers: Women weaving at the Bauhaus

In this program, the first in the series about Bauhaus Women, Nicholas Fox Weber, Executive Director, The Josef and Anni Albers Foundation, spotlights Anni Albers’s works and experience at the Bauhaus, including her pivotal role in the weaving workshops despite we never heard about them.

Continue reading “Anni Albers: Women weaving at the Bauhaus”

How needlework has become part of the feminist movement by Mouncej1

An interesting article by mouncej1!

Needle in a Fabric Stack

In 1718, women in Pennsylvania were only able to own and manage property if their husbands were incapacitated. This remained true until 1839, when Mississippi was the first state to allow women to own property in their name. In 1878, women were allowed to attend university and obtain a degree. In 1844, women could retain their wages and finally had the right to a separate economy. In 1845, women were allowed to file patents. In 1848, women could sign their own contracts, which meant they would not be held accountable for their husbands debts. On August 18, 1920, women were given the right to vote. In 1923, a bill was passed that allowed women to be able to petition for divorce from their husbands. It was only acceptable for women to wear pants starting in the 1930s, though women strutted the streets in trousers during the 20s. In the 1960s…

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Embroidering Women Stories

Dahlia Rodriguez Atelier

My passion for embroidery has no limits, this is why I´m not taking this art in my hands, because of the respect I have for this needlework.

Nevertheless, I collect in a virtual, and preliminary, gallery, the work of some wonderful artists I admire. These women use the needle to express feelings, perceptions and visions. From the oldest tradition to the most innovative design, stitching is used as language to speak out.

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