Stories and politics at Textile & Place Conference 2020

Next Conference Textile and Place 2020 explores the politics of textiles. Hosted by Manchester School of Art, the conference builds upon the debates from the first Textile and Place conference and will take place on 23rd and 24th April 2020 at the Manchester School of Art, Manchester Metropolitan University.

Stories of political stitches, memories and textile will be shared in this amazing, again, conference. A proof of how promising will be this conference is the delegate pack of the previous one.

Keynote speakers are:

Are you participating in this conference?

 

Call for Papers – Textile & Place

Exploring memory, social and political issues through textiles

From 23 to 24 April 2020, the Conference Textile and Place will take place in Manchester School of Art, Manchester Metropolitan University with the aim of exploring politics through textiles. The debates will be built on the findings of the first conference also organised at MMU.

Mapping memories and places, the stories of trade and history transmission, migrations and cultural exchanges are some of the topics that will be raised during this exchange. The connections between communities, movements and alternative narratives through textile issues to be examined.

“We use the word politics as a broad term to indicate how textiles is implicated in particular places and is part of the relationships between groups or organisations and used to confront issues of power.  Textiles can fix us to a place and also be part of the process of making change.”

Invited keynote speakers are Dr. Fionna Barber, Jessica Hemmings, Assadour Markarov, and Vic McEwan.

If you wish to submit your paper, take into account some of the topics suggested:
  • Textiles as a medium of protest and activism.
  • Textile sites which represent migration and globalisation.
  • Narratives of community and social interaction encountered through textiles.
  • Responsibility, textiles and the places we live.

Submit your abstract and short bio by Friday, 8th november 2019.

PUBLICATION OPPORTUNITY
The papers presented at the conference will be considered for publication in a special issue of TEXTILE: Cloth and Culture.WHO SHOULD PARTICIPATE?
We welcome papers from, textile artists, artists exploring textiles among other materials, designers, academics, early career researchers, art, fashion and textile historians, curators and archivists, ECRs, PhD candidates.We also welcome short films and audio-visual work that explore textiles and place for our ‘Film as textile site’ space.

Textiles in Art History, a gendered issue

On the occasion of Anni Albers exhibition at Tate Modern, Amber Butchart wrote a very interesting article for Frieze on how textile history has been separated from Art History and Fine Art because it has been always a women´s work.

The artificial divide that exists between fine art and textiles (or applied/decorative arts, or craft) is a gendered issue. ‘Textiles have always suffered as an art media because of their association with domesticity and femininity,’ says Hannah Lamb of The 62 Group of Textile Artists, an artist-led pressure group that has been promoting textiles as a fine art for nearly 60 years.

This opinion article share important foundations in which I support this research and how political stitching as other creative manifestations have been dismissed from Art History.

Indeed, me as student of Art History, I was never told about Anni Albers contribution to the Bauhaus. And the review of textile art was almost avoided during the whole university programme.

Read it here and share your thoughts

Call for Papers on Textile Intersections:

Textile Intersections Conference organised by the Textile Design Research Group at Loughborough University in collaboration with Royal College of Art and Queen Mary University London, launched a call for papers. The conference will be held in London, Loughborough University in London, from 12 to 14 September 2019.

TEXTILE INTERSECTIONS is interested in topics related to connections and cross- or interdisciplinary collaborations furthering research in the field of textiles and textile design. The focus will be on the nature of collaborations textiles are susceptible to establish with other disciplines and the consequent opportunities for each discipline. How are these collaborations initiated? What makes a successful collaboration leading to innovative research? What are the issues? Why collaborate?

Deadline for submission of abstracts is: 25th March 2019

More information can be found here: http://www.textile-intersections.com

Provocative Fiber Art Made by Women

THE ANCIENT GREEKS put fate in the hands of three old women, goddesses who spun the thread of life, twisted it to allot each individual a measure of joy or sorrow, and wielded the “abhorred shears” (in the poet John Milton’s phrase) that could cut life short. The Greeks knew something that artists, along with a new generation of “craftivists” (people combining craft with activism), are rediscovering — that fiber (woven, knitted, braided, quilted, crocheted, embroidered) can be an expressive medium, one more powerful, perhaps, for its ubiquity. Textiles, after all, accompany us on nearly every step of life: We are born and swaddled, buried in shrouds;

An article written by LESLIE CAMHI published on MARCH 14, 2018 at the https://www.nytimes.com/ and shared at Craftivism Lab.

This article makes a review of relevant artists using textiles to speak out. From Albers to the Pussy Hat initiative, you will find several references to wonderful experiences and stories handmade by women.

Some of the Most Provocative Political Art is Made With Fibers

The Greeks knew something that artists, along with a new generation of “craftivists” (people combining craft with activism), are rediscovering — that fiber (woven, knitted, braided, quilted, crocheted, embroidered) can be an expressive medium, one more powerful, perhaps, for its ubiquity. Textiles, after all, accompany us on nearly every step of life: We are born and swaddled, buried in shrouds; most of us are even conceived between sheets.

….

Sophia Narrett, a recent Rhode Island School of Design graduate whose solo exhibition of embroideries opens at Brooklyn’s BRIC Arts/Media center in May, wrote in an email, “When an object is developed by human hands for hundreds of hours, it leaves a quality in the surface that can be sensed.”

Ge Ba, textile collage by Chinese Women

Found in moowon an amazing article about textile collage prepared by Chinese women living in the countryside.