UDHR Quilt Project

Some time ago I participated in a craftivist project called UDHR Quilt that aims to promote human rights.

The #UDHRquilt Project is a collaborative craftivism initiative documenting the Universal Declaration of Human Rights (UDHR). It uses craft as a tool and a strategy to celebrate the UHDR and raise awareness to the ways it is challenged—even violated—around the world today.

Central to the project are four large quilted wall hangings, each featuring 30 embroidered blocks representing the 30 Articles of the UDHR. The blocks critically engage with the Articles, celebrating the intrinsic meanings of this landmark document, now in its 70th year, while also drawing attention to local and global human rights issues.

My contribution was to embroider the Article 3 of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights (UDHR). Through my stitching work, I tried to highlight the rights of women and the LGBTIQ + collective.

The block that I embed is part of a quilt in which the rest of articles of the UDHR are included.

In the project we participate more than 130 people, mostly women, from around the world. It was a great honor for me.

Here you can see in detail my block, those of the other people and read more about the project and the Universal Declaration. 

Because never is late to raise your voice for human rights.

Embroidered Lifeline for Palestinian Women Refugees in Jordan

Empowering Embroidery

Discovered thanks to the Guardian another amazing initiative using crafts, embroidery in this case, to support women refugees social inclusion. SEP JORDAN, is a social entrepreneurship initiative founded by Roberta Ventura, an Italian born woman based in Geneva.

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Credits: The Guardian. Asma Aradeh, employed by social enterprise SEP Jordan inspects embroidery work together with two colleagues. Photograph: Faras Oran

SEP Jordan describes themselves as ethical fashion start-up distinguished by their intricate embroidery and geometric patterns, and storytelling. For them “Every Stitch Tells a Story: each piece is embroidered by a single talented artist” based in  Jerash Camp in Jordan.

Ensuring that the marvelous cross-stitch technique is being passed down from generation to generation, SEP Jordan works to empower “less fortunate artists with professional, personal and economic stability”.

CNN visit their atelier and interviewed Palestinian artists on the impact of this beautiful work.

Discover their amazing work here and follow the on facebook.

 

 

Embroidering Women Stories

My passion for embroidery has no limits, this is why I´m not taking this art in my hands, because of the respect I have for this needlework.

Nevertheless, I collect in a virtual, and preliminary, gallery, the work of some wonderful artists I admire. These women use the needle to express feelings, perceptions and visions. From the oldest tradition to the most innovative design, stitching is used as language to speak out.

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