Save the Date! Design+Crafts+Fashion = Al Hilo de Pertegaz

From 31 October to 30 November 2018 an amazing exhibition will take place at the Centro de Artesanía de Aragón, Monasterio de Samos s/n, Zaragoza (Spain). The exhibition brings together design, crafts and fashion in a complex exercise aimed at paying tribute to Spanish fashion designer Pertegaz on the occasion of the centenary of his birth.

As many other initiatives bridging crafts and design, the regional authorities of Aragon and professional association of artisans of the region have been working hard in the latest years with the aim of celebrating the excellence and unique beauty of handmade work.

In partnership with FITCA, they brought together several designers and artisans around Manuel Pertegaz heritage in order to design and create a collection of garments based on the marriage between artisanship, design and fashion. The result will be presented in this exhibition.

Exposición_en_la_Sala_Canal_de_Isabel_II_del_modisto_Manuel_Pertegaz
By cristina cifuentes – https://www.flickr.com/photos/42181172@N02/36934598492/, CC BY 2.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=62290348

Looking forward to discovering the amazing work done.

Bihor vs Dior

It happens once again.

A big fashion company gets too much inspired by a folk design only few artisans in a small country make. Tory Burch, Valentino, Chanel or Louis Vuitton have presented original traditional designs from all over the world as new items in their collections.

This time Dior, who already used crazy patchwork techniques in their last collection, presented their own design, an imitiation of Beius jacket from Romania. While Dior sells the jacket by thousands of euros, local artisans confront gorgeous challenges to keep alive their traditions.

In order to support local artisans and enhancing this tradition, Bihor Couture brand was launched with local craftsmen as designers.

Now more about them and why not support them by acquiring a great garment.

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Margaret & the art of Ndebele women

When a woman meets a group of women, all of them creative, only good things can result from this experience.

It´s the case of the photographer Margaret Courtney-Clarke and her photo documentary about the art of Ndebele women.

Based in West Africa, these women use vernacular art to enhance traditional architecture by painting them by hand using linear elements and “traditional design concepts borrowed from their ancestors“.

Captura de pantalla 2018-05-23 a las 7.30.58

For Margaret Courtney-Clarke, the objective of African Canva work is:

My objective in this work is to document an extraordinary art form – vernacular art and architecture in West Africa – that is not transportable and therefore not seen in museums around the world. It is an attempt to capture the unseen Africa, a glimpse into the homes and into the spirit of very proud and dignified peoples. In much the same way as I photographed the art of Ndebele women, I have drawn on my personal affinity for the art itself, for methods, design and form, rather than the socio-anthropological or political realities of a people or continent in dilemma. These images portray a unique tradition of Africa, a celebration of an indigenous rural culture in which the women are the artists and the home her canvas. Margaret Courtney-Clarke, 1990

Watch the pictures here.